Home > Domain Name News > Boston Ivy will drop the premium domain renewal prices in .Broker, .Forex, .Markets, .Trading
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Boston Ivy will drop the premium domain renewal prices in .Broker, .Forex, .Markets, .Trading

Boston Ivy announced that it will be dropping the premium renewal prices to standard for 4 of its New gTLDs: .Broker, .Forex, .Markets and .Trading.

The change will take place on May 1st. Going forward the non-registered premium domain names will have a premium upfront cost and standard renewal.

For example, the domain name ARTS.BROKER has a $10,000 upfront price and then a $20 renewal.

The registry will also be running a $5 registration program for the month of May for all 4 TLDs.

Boston Ivy will also be dropping 35,000+ three (3) character names for .Markets and .Trading. These 35,000+ names will become available for general registration at standard price on May 1st. The following 2 character domain names (NL, LN and NN) have been released for .broker and .forex in November 2016 and will also be released for .Markets and .Trading.

Last month Boston Ivy greatly reduced  their wholesale domain name pricing for .Broker, .Forex, .Markets and .Trading:

Boston Ivy Registry has 6 New gTLDs: .broker, .forex, .CFD, .markets, .spreadbetting and .trading. The company is backed by IG Group.

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About Konstantinos Zournas

Konstantinos studied Computer Engineering and Computer Science in London and lives in Athens, Greece. He works on domain names, websites and software development. Has been online since 1995 & domaining since 2002.

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8 comments

  1. Domain investors don’t want these nor do real businesses. Dropping premiums won’t do much to find demand.

    • I think they are following want the market wants, which is a good thing. Whether they help increase the numbers is another thing. However, I think they need to increase there registrar base, that would probably be the biggest benefit.

  2. Right now supply exceeds demand. The right domains still trickle thru sales, but the issue has been cost, as registries have been the domainer, and they are realizing just how hard it is to be a domainer, when you are holding something with no new money coming in.

  3. As was revealed by UniRegistry’s attempted renewal price hikes, the world learned that there are no price caps on these new gtld domain name renewals pricing.
    Even if you are lured by a new price of $20 today, there is nothing stopping them hiking up the renewal price back again to $500 or more – or much much more.
    Trust regarding renewal pricing has evaporated with these new gtlds.

    • I don’t think Boston Ivy would raise prices any time soon and if they do only marginally. To raise the prices to what they had prior to the big decrease would destroy their name and to be honest wouldn’t make any sense. You also have to look at who backs them, IG, a big company with a lot of money. I don’t see them going anywhere or doing anything stupid as it would look bad on both of them.

      I am willing to take the risk on buying some names from them for that reason

  4. Their tlds need to be made available on all the mainstream registrars in order to reach end users (I think they are working on this). Boston Ivy owns only a few tlds but their tlds are top quality terms related to finance. It may take them a few years to be popular and for their tlds to have many registrations. Decreasing renewal prices is the way to go. It is proven that even big companies would not buy or invest in domains that have high renewals. If you own domains that have high renewals, it will not be easy to find a buyer hence the resale price will decrease dramatically even if you own category killer names. I think Boston Ivy is taking time to do this because they do proper research and study before deciding to implement things for the benefit of their company and for the benefit of domain investors and end users.

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