No One Wants To See Your ID! We Have Escrow.com Instead…

gtldsI received an email that seems more like spam than a legitimate email offering a domain name for sale.

Maybe the fact that the sender doesn’t know what BCC is and included my email in the “to:” part together with 20 other email addresses made me think this is spam. πŸ™‚

This is the email I received:

Hello,

i am the owner ofΒ *****.blackΒ domain name.Β If you want to buy this name please let me know. I can provide you a copy of my id card to verify my ownership.
phone: 30****
e-mail: space****@hotmail.com
facebook: Rapid****
address: *, Heraklion, Crete island, Greece
Regards,
A K
Yes, he happens to be Greek, a newbie in domains selling a New gTLD that makes no sense (like table.blue), he is 29 years old (judging from his email address) and doesn’t know what BCC and spam is. He is about to learn now.
And of course no one wants to see his ID card! We can use Escrow.com instead and avoid meeting on a ferry to Crete to make the deal happen! πŸ™‚
Sold.Domains

About Konstantinos Zournas

Konstantinos studied Computer Engineering and Computer Science in London and lives in Athens, Greece. He works on domain names, websites and software development. Has been online since 1995 & domaining since 2002.

7 comments

  1. You didn’t want to buy Jack.Black? πŸ˜›

  2. I received an email yesterday using the same template but selling a different domain. There as well he sent to multiple people directly in the “To” field.

    If domainers want to annoy potential buyers, that’s a great way to do start off on the wrong foot.

    • Maybe he’s targeting super brilliant buggers like you with GRE scores of 800 / 750?

      Seriously, who lists stuff like that? Do you not understand how society works? And you make fun of this guy for not knowing how to use BCC?

      • @Troy,

        A better question would be this:

        What kind of pathetic dweeb is digging through my LinkedIn profile looking at my GRE scores … and thinks that my graduate school entrance exam tests are some sort of ammunition to use against me in a discussion about domaining? How on earth is that relevant here?

        LinkedIn is a website for career networking. It has sections for test scores as well as education and employment history. When I left the Navy in 2011, I filled out a profile. Like most people, I entered data in the fields provided. Before I got involved in domaining, I was actually planning on pursuing a PhD program; and for that sort of career path, GRE scores are mandatory.

        Troy, you brought this up – not me. It isn’t as if I go around bragging about my test scores. Yes, I know how society works. Clearly, you do not. I’ve seen some embarrassing attempts at backstabbing from domainers, my friend; but you take the cake!

        And for the record, I wasn’t “making fun” of this domainer spamming the rest of us. Konstantinos (not I) wrote the article. If anything, by criticizing spam like that, we’re all advising new domainers do things the right way, which will help them get sales … by not annoying their buyers. We all object to spam like this don’t we? Even you, I hope.

        Not sure what you have against me, Troy. Maybe you can tell me.

  3. Flippa just made the same mistake a few minutes ago, sending an email to over 100 people with all our email addresses in the “To” field.

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