The Castello Brothers sell the domain Traveler.com – It becomes a new crypto travel aggregator

Michael Castello, of Castello Brothers LLC, announced the sale of the domain name Traveler.com. The announcement came in a comment on DomainInvesting.com.

Michael Castello did not disclose any more details for this sale and the domain name whois still reflects his company’s info. The purchase was done maybe on a payment plan or some other more complicated deal.

But the new buyer is already known as the new website is up and running. Traveler.com is a crypto-friendly discount travel aggregation platform that claims to be offering lower prices on travel products and services to consumers than traditional outlets, through an internal real-time crypto to fiat exchange and use of the native Traveler utility token (“TRVL”) on the site.

Michael said that the price will be made public but did not say when. Of course some will say that this is another big crypto domain name sale. Well yes, but not exactly.

On another interesting note, back in 2008 the Castello brothers teamed up with Rob Monster to develop their Traveler.com domain into a global travel portal. I guess these plans never worked out.

What I found a bit confusing is that there is another TRVL Token coming out that seems very similar. The other TRVL token can be found at TravelBlock.io.

Almost the same team that runs Traveler.com (as a discount travel platform) seems to be also running TripX.com, a BlockChain Payment Solution, that will launch TripCoin that will become a Crypto Currency that will power travel transactions around the globe that the website claims will be faster, cheaper and more securely than today’s alternatives.

Here is some more info on Traveler.com: “Traveler.com is a discount travel platform that saves you up to 60% over other leading sites, like Travelocity and Expedia, exclusively for members and holders of the TRVL coin. Our innovative platform lets members and holders purchase travel services with cryptocurrencies, to deliver an unparalleled price advantage directly to our users.”

Also here is a video from Michael Culhane, CEO of both companies:

Sold.Domains

About Konstantinos Zournas

Konstantinos studied Computer Engineering and Computer Science in London and lives in Athens, Greece. He works on domain names, websites and software development. Has been online since 1995 & domaining since 2002.

10 comments

  1. Looks like a solid seven figure sale! Congratulations to Michael and David.

  2. Michael’s comment needs to be shared here:

    “Thank you Google and GoDaddy for the dumbing down of the domain industry. Estibot valuates Traveler.com at $90k. Godaddy; above $25k. You can take a look at Traveler.com and figure out what I sold it for this year. When the price is made public, they will certainly update their output. Originally Estibot valuated Whisky.com $27k which sold for $3.1 million in 2014. Low and behold it now shows $3.2 million. Brilliant. Valuating domain names especially generic .com is like putting a price on fine art. Let the buyers dictate.”

  3. Congrats to David & Michael on the sale

  4. Those crypto-guys raise fools’ money through unregulated ICOs, that’s where that (dirty) money to purchase premium domain like Traveler.com come from, it’s money coming from scams which fuel more fraud … from “crypto-trading platform” to other pseudo-businesses …
    As for the “would-be business” on Traveler.com, once Expedia and some other big guys wake up, they are gonna get crushed …
    IMHO their business will be short-lived and we’ll see the domain on the market again soon …
    Current crypto-currencies, besides being worthless, are scams, fraud, huge, energy-wasting, Ponzi schemes, and blockchain is not useful, certainly not a competitive advantage for a company or anyone … When the hype, the pyramid schemes stop working and the bubble bursts many will get left holding the (empty) bag … that’s where fool’s money end …
    That said, congrats to Michael for the sale. 🙂

  5. I am able to confirm that Traveler.com is a great domain.

    But clearly the sale price could not have been any more than $48,000: https://ibb.co/eOEgsx

  6. Big claims 60% savings, where most of these companies are making a 4-8 % margin on bookings, sounds like hotels.club is out of business.

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