.Amazon New gTLD No More!

New gTLD applications for .amazon and related IDNs in Japanese and Chinese filed by Amazon EU S.à r.l. should not proceed. ICANN announced this last night after the GAC advised the ICANN Board in its Durban Communiqué that the GAC reached “consensus on GAC Objection Advice according to Module 3.1 part I of the Applicant Guidebook.

By adopting the GAC advice, the NGPC notes that the decision is without prejudice to the continuing efforts by Amazon EU S.à r.l. and members of the GAC to pursue dialogue on the relevant issues.

This is ICANN’s Rationale from the 14th of May 2014:

The NGPC’s action today, addressing open items of GAC advice concerning .AMAZON (and related IDNs in Japanese and Chinese), is part of the ICANN Board’s role to address advice put to it by the Governmental Advisory Committee (GAC). Article XI, Section 2.1 of the ICANN Bylaws http://www.icann.org/en/about/governance/bylaws#XI permit the GAC to “put issues to the Board directly, either by way of comment or prior advice, or by way of specifically recommending action or new policy development or revision to existing policies.” The ICANN Bylaws require the Board to take into account the GAC‘s advice on public policy matters in the formulation and adoption of the policies. If the Board decides to take an action that is not consistent with the GAC advice, it must inform the GAC and state the reasons why it decided not to follow the advice. The Board and the GAC will then try in good faith to find a mutually acceptable solution. If no solution can be found, the Board will state in its final decision why the GAC advice was not followed.

The action being approved today is to accept the GAC‘s advice to the ICANN Board contained in the GAC‘s Durban Communiqué stating that it is the consensus of the GAC that the applications for .AMAZON (application number 1-1315-58086) and related IDNs in Japanese (application number 1-1318-83995) and Chinese (application number 1-1318-5591) should not proceed. The New gTLD Applicant Guidebook (AGB) provides that if “GAC advises ICANN that it is the consensus of the GAC that a particular application should not proceed, this will create a strong presumption for the ICANN Board that the application should not be approved.” (AGB § 3.1) To implement this advice, the NGPC is directing the ICANN President and CEO (or his designee) that the applications for .AMAZON (application number 1-1315-58086) and related IDNs in Japanese (application number 1-1318-83995) and Chinese (application number 1-1318-5581) filed by Amazon EU S.à r.l. should not proceed. By adopting the GAC advice, the NGPC notes that the decision is without prejudice to the continuing efforts by Amazon EU S.à r.l. and members of the GAC to pursue dialogue on the relevant issues.

As part of its consideration of the GAC advice, ICANN posted the GAC advice and officially notified applicants of the advice, including Amazon EU S.à r.l. (the applicant for .AMAZON (and related IDNs)), triggering the 21-day applicant response period pursuant to the Applicant Guidebook Module 3.1. Amazon’s response to the Board is provided at: http://newgtlds.icann.org/en/applicants/gac-advice/, and the NGPC has considered this response as part of its deliberations on the GAC advice. In its response to the Board, Amazon asserted that the GAC advice should be rejected because: (1) it is inconsistent with international law; (2) the acceptance of GAC advice would be non-transparent and discriminatory, which conflicts with ICANN‘s governing documents; and (3) the GAC Advice contravenes policy recommendations implemented within the Applicant Guidebook and achieved through international consensus over many years.

The NGPC previously decided to further study and analyze the issues raised by the applicant and the GAC advice, and in a recent iteration of the GAC-NGPC Scorecard [PDF, 371 KB] adopted by the NGPC on 5 February 2014 noted that “ICANN has commissioned an independent, third-party expert to provide additional analysis on the specific issues of application of law at issue, which may focus on legal norms or treaty conventions relied on by Amazon or governments.” The independent, third-party expert analysis [PDF, 737 KB] (“Expert Analysis”) explores relevant international and local law on geographical indications, related international treaties, and principles of intellectual property law to address the specific issues of application of law at issue. Among other things, the Expert Analysis considers whether the consensus advice issued by the GAC is of such nature as to oblige ICANN to reject the application filed by Amazon, or to the contrary, whether the rules and principles cited by Amazon in its response of 23 August 2013 to the GAC‘s advice oblige ICANN to approve the applications for .AMAZON (and related IDNs). The Expert Analysis concludes the following:

As regards the application for assignment of the new gTLD ‘.amazon’ filed by the Amazon company:

i) there is no rule of international, or even regional or national, law applicable in the field of geographical indications which obliges ICANN to reject the application;

ii) there is no rule of international, or even regional or national, law applicable in the field of intellectual property and in particular of trade marks or in the field of fundamental rights, which obliges ICANN to accept this application.

The Expert Analysis, which was considered as part of the NGPC’s deliberations in adopting this resolution, was provided to the GAC as well as Amazon on 7 April 2014. ICANN provided the Expert Analysis to keep the parties informed and noted that it welcomed any additional information that the parties believed to be relevant to the NGPC in making its final decision on the GAC‘s advice.

In response to the 7 April 2014 communication to the GAC and Amazon, ICANN received related correspondence, including the following, which were considered as part of the NGPC’s action:

  • Letter [PDF, 66 KB] dated 11 April 2014 from Mr. Fernando Rojas Samanéz (Vice Minister of Foreign Affairs, Peru). The letter comments on the independent, third party advice and requests that the NGPC reject the applications for .AMAZON. The letter comments on the Expert Analysis and requests that the NGPC reject the applications for .AMAZON.
  • Letter dated 14 April 2014 from Mr. Benedicto Fonseca Filho (Director, Department of Scientific and Technological Themes, Ministry of External Relations, Federative Republic of Brazil) and Mr. Virgilio Fernandes Almeida (National Secretary for Information Technology Policies, Ministry of Science, Technology and Innovation, Federative Republic of Brazil). The letter reiterates Brazil’s objection to the applications for .AMAZON.
  • Letter dated 14 April 2014 from Mr. Scott Hayden (Vice President, Intellectual Property – Amazon). The letter comments on the Expert Analysis and requests that the NGPC allow the applications for .AMAZON to continue to move forward.

The NGPC considered several significant factors during its deliberations about how to address the GAC advice concerning .AMAZON (and related IDNs). The NGPC had to balance the competing interests of each factor to arrive at a decision. The concerns raised by the relevant parties highlight the difficulty of the issue. In addition to the factors highlighted above, the following are among the factors the NGPC found to be significant:

  • Although the NGPC does not have the benefit of the rationale relied upon by the GAC in issuing its consensus advice in the Durban Communiqué on the applications for .AMAZON (and related IDNs), the NGPC considered the reason/rationale provided in the GAC Early Warning [PDF, 79 KB] submitted on behalf of the governments of Brazil and Peru on 20 November 2012 expressing concern regarding Amazon’s application for the .AMAZON gTLD. In the Early Warning, the concerned governments indicated that among other reasons, it was requesting that Amazon withdraw its application because “[g]ranting exclusive rights to this specific gTLD to a private company would prevent the use of this domain for the purposes of public interest related to the protection, promotion and awareness raising on issues related to the Amazon biome. It would also hinder the possibility of use of this domain to congregate web pages related to the population inhabiting that geographical region.” The Early Warning also explains that the applied-for string “matches part of the name, in English, of the ‘Amazon Cooperation Treaty Organization’, an international organization which coordinates initiatives in the framework of the Amazon Cooperation Treaty….”
  • The NGPC also considered correspondence received on the matter, and takes particular note of correspondence from Amazon dated 4 July 2013 and 3 December 2013, wherein Amazon describes its “attempts to find a mutual resolution with the Governments of Brazil and Peru” concerning the .AMAZON applications, and the public interest commitments it is willing to include as contractually enforceable provisions in the Registry Agreement. Amazon indicates that it is willing to be contractually committed to do the following:
    • Limit the registration of culturally sensitive terms such as “Amazonia,” “Amazonas,” and “Amazonica” under the .AMAZON new gTLD to OTCA [Organização do Tratado de Cooperação Amazônica’s] and its Member Governments.
    • Continue to engage in good faith discussions with the OTCA and its member governments to identify any other existing terms of specific cultural sensitivity.
    • Present a Memorandum of Understanding to ICANN setting out Amazon’s non-objection to any future application filed by the OTCA and/or its Member Governments for the terms “.AMAZONIA”, “.AMAZONAS”, or “.AMAZONICA”.
  • The NGPC considered the community-developed processes established in the Applicant Guidebook, including Section 5.1 of the Applicant Guidebook, which provides that, “ICANN‘s Board of Directors has ultimate responsibility for the New gTLD Program. The Board reserves the right to individually consider an application for a new gTLD to determine whether approval would be in the best interest of the Internet community. Under exceptional circumstances, the Board may individually consider a gTLD application. For example, the Board might individually consider an application as a result of GAC Advice on New gTLDs or of the use of an ICANN accountability mechanism.”

As part of its deliberations, the NGPC’s review of significant materials included, but is not limited to the following, letters, materials and documents:

There are no foreseen fiscal impacts associated with the adoption of this resolution. Approval of the resolution will not impact security, stability or resiliency issues relating to the DNS. As part of ICANN‘s organizational administrative function, ICANN posted the Singapore Communiqué, the Buenos Aires Communiqué, the Durban Communiqué, and the Beijing Communiqué and officially notified applicants of the advice. In each case, this triggered the 21-day applicant response period pursuant to the Applicant Guidebook Module 3.1. Additionally, as noted above, the Expert Analysis was provided to the GAC as well as Amazon on 7 April 2014. ICANN provided the analysis to keep the parties informed and noted that it welcomed any additional information that the parties believed to be relevant to the NGPC in making its final decision on the GAC‘s advice.

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About Konstantinos Zournas

Konstantinos studied Computer Engineering and Computer Science in London and lives in Athens, Greece. He loves domains and building websites. He is online since 1995, learned about html in 1996 and got into domains in 2002. He started the OnlineDomain.com blog in 2012.

4 comments

  1. Yet another really stupid decision and here is why:

    1. Amazon, the net’s leading online retailer, will now not participate in the gtld rollout. To the contrary, they will downplay it.

    2. Other firms with dual purpose names will now find themselves in a pickle. The once trumped Cannon will now need to worry that some cannon manufacturer will have superior rights.

    3. Cities such as Miami, Florida who may have had ambitions of getting a gtld will now need to be concerned about any of the 10 other cities with the same name.

    4. This decision will have a chilling effect on future applicants who may have been considering shelling out the big bucks to sponsor a new tld.

    5. The gtld’s were a foolish idea and on shaky ground before. This will serve as yet another nail in their coffin. Only a matter of time. I give them 6-9 months, if that long. And that’s being generous.

    • The decision was according to the rules. You can say the rules were stupid.

      1. Amazon had 76 New gTLD applications so I don’t think this they are going to downplay their new gtlds. They are paying
      good money for them.

      2.
      a.Not really. There are no superior rights. This is first come first served or in case of multiple applicants you go to auction.
      b. These are not dual purpose names. These are everyday terms that they chose to use as their brands. This choice had
      dangers from when they choose to use them. They knew it then and they know it now. Thank god that trademarks have some
      “drawbacks”. If I name my company New York, I can’t get the .newyork tld.

      3. Of course. Why not? We have auctions for that. Although this is not the case here. You are comparing cities when the case here was between a region and a website/retailer. What do you think is more important? A whole region or a website?

      4. No. These were the rules from the beginning. No city, country or region new gtld without governmental consent. If you want to bend this rule(or any rule) for Amazon then who knows what will happen next. (take a look at UDRP with panelists bending the rules)

      5. This decision will not matter on what happens with new gtlds. You give a lot of weight on a case that was dead on arrival.
      6-9 months until what happens? Because the best new gtlds are going to start coming next year.

      • #5…I agree that the gtlds will ALL soon be history. They are all so MIND BLOWINGLY STOOOPID, ass backwards and make no sense! If you say that the “best” ones will be arriving next year, I have two comments. First, I dont think the world has the patience to wait snd the expiment will have been deemed a failure by then. Secondly, I looked through the list and saw nothing that I think has any potential whatsoever. Some think .web has a glimmer of potential. Ha! No better then .net. Some think .guru has a chance in hell. Not. Much worse than .pro.

      • There is one thing saying you don’t like New gTLDs or that they will not succeed but there is another saying that the New gTLDs will soon be history.
        That is crazy talk. That are millions invested in New gTLDs and they are not going to stop any time soon or ever for that matter.

        Who is this world you are referring to? Domainers? End users? Planet earth?

        Here are a few that are coming:
        .NYC, .London: live in a few months
        .Buy, .Online, .Live: 9 July 2014
        .Ltd, .Fashion, .Health: 17 September 2014
        .Legal, Auto, .RealEstate: 22 October 2014
        .Free, .DIY: January 2015
        .Doctor, .BET, .Forum: February 2015

        2015:
        .Food, .Gay, .Blog, .Radio, .App, .Home, .Hotel, .Cloud, News, .Art, Music, .Movie, Store, .Wine, Search, .Kids/.Kid, .Car/Cars, .Sport/.Sports, .Game/Games and .Web/.Webs.

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