Updated New gTLD Auction Schedule From ICANN

The New gTLD Auction Schedule is updated as of 11 August 2014. This version is updated to reflect the 2015 Auction Dates for January, February, and March. Also reflected is the finalization of the Name Collision Occurrence Management Framework as it pertains to the Auction Schedule. Because the Framework is now finalized, postponement requests on this basis will no longer be accommodated.

Understanding Auctions

Overview

Contention sets are groups of applications containing identical or confusingly similar applied for gTLD strings. Contention sets must be resolved prior to the execution of a Registry Agreement for an applied-for gTLD string. An ICANN facilitated auction is a last resort for resolving String Contention Sets, as described in the Applicant Guidebook (AGB)section 4.3.

Auctions will be conducted over the Internet using a procedure know as an ascending-clock auction, where the auctioneer successively increases the start-of-round and end-of-round range of prices, on a per auction round basis. Applicants within the contention set must submit bids to indicate their willingness to pay an amount within the defined price range in the auction round. As the price ranges of the auction rounds increase, applicants may successively choose to exit the auction. When a sufficient number of applications have exited the auction process, so that the remaining application(s) are no longer in contention with one another, and all the relevant string(s) can be delegated as gTLDs, the auction will be deemed concluded. At this point, prevailing applicants that remained in the auction will pay the finalized price and proceed toward delegation.

Auction Eligibility

A String Contention Set will be eligible to enter into a New gTLD Program Auction under the following circumstances only:

  • All active applications in the contention set have:
    • Passed evaluation
    • Resolved any applicable GAC advice
    • Resolved any objections
    • No pending ICANN Accountability Mechanisms
  • Each applied-for gTLD in the contention set is:
    • Not classified as “High-Risk” per the Name Collision Occurrence Management Plan
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About Konstantinos Zournas

Konstantinos studied Computer Engineering and Computer Science in London and lives in Athens, Greece. He works on domain names, websites and software development. Has been online since 1995 & domaining since 2002.

3 comments

  1. “Contention sets are groups of applications containing identical or confusingly similar applied for gTLD strings. Contention sets must be resolved prior to the execution of a Registry Agreement for an applied-for gTLD string.”

    I get a kick out of that line… I understand some technical issues are based upon the Name Collision Occurrence Management Plan, but the “confusingly similar” line is clearly being factored in, because they already have a mix of confusingly similar TLDs, including singular / plural and synonyms. In some cases, they have some that are not confusingly similar, but just plain confusing, such as .dot. Just imagine radio spots saying “get the latest shoe styles at shoes dot dot”

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