eNom and Tucows don’t use their official websites for domain name verifications

With the introduction of the 2013 Registrar Accreditation Agreement (RAA) registrars are obligated to send whois verification emails to all domain name registrants. Inaccurate contact data may result in the suspension or termination of a domain registration.

Almost immediately after registrars started sending verification emails, various phishing scams appeared. Such as the one for the #1 registrar in the world: Go Daddy.

I have noticed 2 registrars that don’t use their official website domain name for domain name verifications that are sent to registrants thus making it even harder for registrants to identify phishing attempts.

The registrars are eNom and Tucows that are both big scale domain name resellers. Maybe that is the reason that the try to keep their brand hidden: to allow their resellers to have some brand recognition. But that creates more problems at this point.

These are the domain names that these 2 registrars use for RAA verification:
eNom (and eNom Central and resellers):
name-services.com (rra.name-services.com)

Tucows (and OpenSRS resellers)
domainadmin.com

So if you get an email and the link inside includes these 2 domain names, the link is safe.

But still anyone can confuse for example the domain name name-services.com for name-service.com or names-services.com.

I think eNom and Tucows should consider changing this.

Also I don’t understand why some registrars require you to log into your account so you can verify your contact email. It should be as easy as this:
a) click link in verification email message
b) browser opens and loads: done. You are verified

Are they afraid that someone that has hijacked your email will verify your domain name
to keep it from being suspended?

Until now more than 200 registrars have signed the 2013 RAA. Registrars that want to offer new gTLD domain name registrations are required to sign the 2013 RAA. Moniker.com is the only top 10 registrar that has not yet signed the 2013 RAA so it has not send any verification emails yet.

Enom “Bulk Global Edit Unlock” is not functioning – Enom is working on a fix

I was trying for about 24 hours to unlock a few of my domains at Enom so I could transfer them out. I had no luck. I was using the Bulk Global Edit by adding my domain list and trying to remove the Registrar Lock. I did it 3 times over the 24 hour period but it didn’t work.

So I contacted support and asked them about it. I am used to bad support lately from domain name registrars so what was surprising was that  the support was very professional, knew what questions to ask and understood what the problem was.

And that is even though I had already unlocked the domains by doing them one by one at the individual domain name control panel before I got their reply. It seems that the Global Edit tool has the problem and Enom support was able to reproduce the problem and confirm it with me. If it was any other registrar except some bright exceptions I think they would have treated me like a crazy person.

I was told that they are working on a fix. Waiting to hear from them.

.org Namejet Project 94 Results: 23 of 39 domains sold for a total of $55,019 (yo.org $7,806, ur.org $6,006)

From April 9 to April 18, 2013, Namejet/Enom offered on 3 day auctions 39 rare, valuable one and two character .org domain names. 23 of the total 39 domains were sold in this auction with a total price of $55,019 USD. The average sales price for the 23 domains was $2,392. The top domains were yo.org that sold for $7,806 and ur.org that got $6,006. Of course all these are reseller prices just like what the 42 Go Daddy Project 94 .org domains got.

Here is the complete list of the 23 sold .org domains:

Domain Name Price
yo.org $7,806
ur.org $6,006
75.org $5,654
zl.org $4,155
zp.org $3,554
pj.org $3,500
31.org $3,425
57.org $3,411
yk.org $3,100
3g.org $2,800
d3.org $1,550
r4.org $1,339
6g.org $1,009
0d.org $857
0n.org $855
5c.org $832
1w.org $764
o7.org $760
z9.org $755
0t.org $753
0p.org $743
z8.org $741
9q.org $650

One letter and one number .org domains had high reserve price and although they got many bids of up to $60k for u.org, not a single one was sold. Here is the list of the 16 one letter and one number .org domains that didn’t get the reserve price and weren’t sold:

Domain Name High Bid
u.org $60,000 Reserve Not Met
j.org $31,000 Reserve Not Met
1.org $30,300 Reserve Not Met
b.org $30,000 Reserve Not Met
r.org $29,100 Reserve Not Met
p.org $25,000 Reserve Not Met
8.org $23,000 Reserve Not Met
0.org $16,643 Reserve Not Met
7.org $15,100 Reserve Not Met
l.org $12,300 Reserve Not Met
2.org $10,600 Reserve Not Met
6.org $10,200 Reserve Not Met
9.org $10,000 Reserve Not Met
4.org $9,099 Reserve Not Met
5.org $8,100 Reserve Not Met
3.org $6,700 Reserve Not Met

Demand Media Acquires Name.com

Demand Media today announced the acquisition of Denver-based domain name registrar Name.com. The acquisition is intended to expand Demand Media’s platform as it prepares for the historic release of new Top Level Domains (TLDs) this year. Founded in 2003, Name.com customers have registered nearly 1.5 million domains. As the second largest registrar in the World, Demand Media’s eNom subsidiary has over 13.5 million domain names on its platform registered by over 8,800 resellers and partners.
Here is the complete press release:
Demand Media Acquires Name.comAdds Domain Name Retail Operations to Registrar ServicesSANTA MONICA, Calif.–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Jan. 7, 2013– Demand Media® (NYSE: DMD), a leading digital media company, today announced the acquisition of Denver-based Name.com, a domain name registrar known for its strong retail footprint, award-winning customer service and creative spirit. The acquisition is intended to expand Demand Media’s platform as it prepares for the historic release of new Top Level Domains (TLDs) this year.Founded in 2003, Name.com customers have registered nearly 1.5 million domains, and use the company’s tools and services to grow their online presence. As the second largest registrar in the World, Demand Media’s eNom subsidiary has over 13.5 million domain names on its platform registered by over 8,800 resellers and partners. “Name.com will provide a direct channel for us to reach consumers and small businesses as they develop and manage their online identities,” saidRichard Rosenblatt, chairman and CEO, Demand Media. “This becomes even more valuable as over one thousand new domain extensions are expected to become available for registration in the years ahead.”In 2011, ICANN initiated the process for creating new domain extensions as a way to increase domain name choices for memorable or descriptive web addresses (for example, integritymortgagesolutions.com can become integrity.mortgage or integritymortgage.solutions) and help organize websites and information better (for example, gwathmey-siegel.com could end in a domain extension that maps to the nature of the business, such as .law, .architect or .cpa). Last June, ICANN announced it had received 1,930 applications for new TLDs that were submitted by entrepreneurs, businesses, governments and communities around the world looking to operate a TLD registry of their own choosing.Demand Media will retain the Denver-based team and the business will report to Taryn Naidu, executive vice president, Registrar Services. “Our strategy is to provide an end-to-end solution for all things domains — whether you are looking to consume or distribute names and services,” said Naidu. “Name.com brings innovation, creativity and a deep commitment to their customers – factors which we believe are essential in the environment of new gTLDs.”About Demand MediaDemand Media, Inc. (NYSE: DMD) is a leading digital media company that informs and entertains one of the internet’s largest audiences, helps advertisers find innovative ways to engage with their customers and enables publishers to expand their online presence. Headquartered in Santa Monica, CA, Demand Media has offices in North America, South America and Europe. For more information about Demand Media, please visit www.demandmedia.com.

Cheapest .xxx domain renewal and transfer prices ($68.17 is the best price)

Extension .xxx is approaching its first anniversary on December 6th and it is time to renew your .xxx domain names. Many people like me used backordering and pre-registrations last year. Some may choose to transfer the domains in order to consolidate them from various registrars to their favorite one. But I think the list below is worth a look so you can see market prices for .xxx renewals and transfers. You might choose to change registrars after all.

Please keep in mind that the registry price for .xxx domain names is not even close to .com or any other major gTLD. It is a staggering $62 and retail prices are of course more than that. So choose wisely what domains you renew and what you drop.

The cheapest price came from what was a surprise to me: GoDaddy at $68.17 (using a coupon). Then there is DomainMonster that has a $69.99 price for .xxx transfers. Name.com (for transfers) and 101domain.com have their pricing set at $75 for .xxx domains.

There are a couple of European Registrars like dinahosting and gandi.net offering .xxx domains for €52 ($67.57) and €55 ($71.47) respectively but depending on where you live you may have to pay VAT tax and also you may have to make substantial purchases to get this rate.

Do you want cheap .xxx prices? Please find below the complete list of prices for .xxx domain names renewals or transfers from most of the .xxx accredited registrars.

North America:
GoDaddy $100.17  ($68.17 with 32% off coupon IAPWD32, expires 12/4/2012) Go Daddy Deal of the Week: 32% off your entire order! Offer expires 12/4/12.
Network Solutions $129.99
Enom $120 – $108 (or less depending on the reseller plan)
Name.com $84.99 ($74.99 for transfers)
101domain.com $75
EnCirca $99
Marcaria.com $79
Webnames.ca $129
register.com $?? (I had to create an account to see the price)
tucows.com $80.18+ (depending or the reseller on opensrs)
NamesBeyond $99
007names.com $92
Moniker $98
Dynadot $84.99 – $79.99 – $77.99 (depending on account discount)
Namecheap $78.88
Latin America:
directNIC $99
namescout.com $85
namevault $79
dattatec.com $99.99
Europe:
eurodns $95.17
domaininfo.com $76
register.it €99
core €66+ (depending on the reseller)
domainmonster.com €89.99 ($69.99 transfer)
easyspace €74.13
Safenames $120
Mailclub € 89
Gandi.net €65,00€ – €55,00 (depending on account discount)
CDmon € 69
Entorno € 59
DonDominio €59.95
Networking4All € 64
united domains € 69
epag € 85
1API (hexonet.net) $79.90
key-systems (dd24) € 88
namebay € 80
dinahosting €52 (€47 registrations)
OVH.com €69.69
Netim € 69
register.eu € 95
NordNet € 79
variomedia € 105
BookMyName.com €62.99
InterNetworx €79.90
Joker.com €91.73
Asia – Pacific:
IpMirror $98
Insta Corporation $119
DomainTheNet $99
MelbourneIT $160
iisp.com $142.39 – $115.05 – $110.03 (depending on account discount)
fabulous.com (.xxx not supported)

A few registrars may offer bulk pricing that is not depicted on these prices. If a registrar is missing or a price is wrong or missing please let me know.

The 9 missing .org domains from Project94.org are country codes: do.org, pt.org, ac.org, bs.org etc.

Do you remember the 9 missing .org domains from Project94.org? According to PIR’s Public Relations firm the remaining 9 are country codes and will be allocated accordingly. I got this note after someone from the PR firm read my article. I am not all clear on how these are going to be allocated. Probably these will go to the respective registries running the ccTLDs.

A few weeks back I wrote about how the Public Interest Registry (PIR), the .ORG registry, will release 94 one and two character .ORG domains using Go Daddy and eNom. The published lists of domains allocated to each registrar at Project94.org  had only 85 .org domains. Go Daddy has 42 and eNom has 43 .org domains. I posted the complete list of these 85 domains here. That left 9 missing domains that are country codes. I was only  able to find 8 of them and here they are:

ac.org – Ascension Island
ar.org – Armenia
bs.org – Bahamas
do.org – Dominican Republic
mw.org – Malawi
pt.org – Portugal
sk.org – Slovakia
vc.org – Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

A few weeks back I ran a whois search for all the possible 2 character combinations in .org. I found 8 of the country codes (in my list of 61 possible domains) but was wrong about j0.org being on the list although I don’t know why as it has the same creation date (7th of May 2012) as the other 94 domains and the same whois result: “Name is reserved by Registry_Policy”.

This leaves me with 53 domains that should have been in this project but aren’t. These are reserved by PIR just like the 94 .org in the current project but I was told that these were not approved by ICANN. Here they are:

2 characters
0B.org
0C.org
0U.org
5P.org
5S.org
5Y.org
6E.org
6I.org
6P.org
6U.org
6V.org
6Y.org
6Z.org
7G.org
7H.org
7I.org
7J.org
7K.org
7M.org
7P.org
7Q.org
7R.org
7X.org
7Y.org
8A.org
8B.org
8C.org
8E.org
8F.org
8H.org
8J.org
8R.org
8S.org
8U.org
8V.org
8X.org
9J.org
9K.org
9L.org
9M.org
9N.org
9P.org
9S.org
B5.org
C8.org
J0.org
J8.org
J9.org
L4.org
L8.org
Q2.org
Q6.org
R5.org

AC.org and j0.org are 2 of the .org domains missing from Project94.org plus 59 possible ones

A few days ago I made a post about how the Public Interest Registry (PIR), the .ORG registry, will release 94 one and two character .ORG domains using Go Daddy and eNom.

PIR published the lists of domains allocated to each registrar at the website Project94.org. The lists have 85 .org domains. Go Daddy has 42 and eNom has 43 .org domains. I posted there the complete list of these 85 domains here.

There were 9 domains adding up to 94 that were missing. I ran a whois search for all the possible 2 character combinations in .org. I found 2 .org domains from the 9 that are missing. These are ac.org and j0.org. All 87 domains have a creation date of the 7th of May 2012. I found another 59 2 character domains that return a whois result only saying “Name is reserved by Registry_Policy”. Some of these are very good like pt.org that is the country code of Portugal. It is most probable that 7 of these 59 domains will be in Project 94. Here is the list of these 59 domains:

2 letters 2 characters
Ar.org 0B.org
Bs.org 0C.org
Do.org 0U.org
Mw.org 5P.org
Pt.org 5S.org
Sk.org 5Y.org
Vc.org 6E.org
6I.org
6P.org
6U.org
6V.org
6Y.org
6Z.org
7G.org
7H.org
7I.org
7J.org
7K.org
7M.org
7P.org
7Q.org
7R.org
7X.org
7Y.org
8A.org
8B.org
8C.org
8E.org
8F.org
8H.org
8J.org
8R.org
8S.org
8U.org
8V.org
8X.org
9J.org
9K.org
9L.org
9M.org
9N.org
9P.org
9S.org
B5.org
C8.org
J8.org
J9.org
L4.org
L8.org
Q2.org
Q6.org
R5.org

I am not sure why PIR named the project “Project 94″ and only presented 85 domain names. What is going to happen to the other 9? What is going to be the allocation process for these? I asked PIR but didn’t get a reply yet.

Go Daddy and Enom are soliciting offers for the 85 .org domains at Project94.org

A few days ago the Public Interest Registry (PIR), which is the .ORG registry, announced that it will release 94 one and two character .ORG domains using Go Daddy and eNom. (36 one and 58 two character) PIR published the lists of domains allocated to each registrar at the website Project94.org. The lists have 85 .org domains. Go Daddy has 42 and eNom has 43 .org domains. You can find the Go Daddy and Enom lists of the total 85 .org domains here. The other 9 two character .org domains are still missing from the lists.

When PIR first took over operation of the .ORG domain in 2003, these names were reserved for future allocation and deemed unavailable for immediate registration. Through a partnership with Go Daddy(Go Daddy Auctions) and eNom (Namejet), the addresses will be made available through an allocation process to companies and organizations who respect the inherent trust and value of the .ORG brand.

Now I see that Go Daddy and Enom are soliciting offers for the 85 .org domains at Project94.org. If you click the “Contact Us” link at the website you will be taken to a web page where you can show your interest in any of the 85 .org domains. Among the usual contact details you also asked to give an offer amount and explain how would you use your .ORG(s).

So it seems that Go Daddy and Enom can choose to give the domains to anyone they choose to but given their extensive use of auctions (GoDaddy Auctions and Namejet) that is not probable. I believe that this auction will happen and will not be affected by “How would you use your .ORG(s)”.

PIR corrected the Go Daddy and Enom .org lists at Project94.org

A couple days ago I made a post about how the Public Interest Registry (PIR), the .ORG registry, will release 94 one and two character .ORG domains using Go Daddy and eNom.

PIR published the lists of domains allocated to each registrar at the website Project94.org. The lists had 85 .org domains. Go Daddy had 43 and eNom 42 .org domains. As I had pointed out that was a mistake with 0.org being in the Godaddy list instead of the Enom  list. That was because Enom will auction all 10 one number .org domains. Now Go Daddy has 42 and eNom 43.org domains

I see today that the lists at Project94.org have been corrected. The other 9 domains adding up to 94 are still MIA.

Here are the correct lists of the 85 .org domains:

GoDaddy
1-letter 2-letters 2-characters
a.org bp.org 2c.org
c.org cq.org 2w.org
d.org fs.org 3p.org
e.org hb.org 5v.org
h.org lo.org 6j.org
i.org nh.org 7d.org
k.org nq.org 7e.org
n.org qd.org b3.org
o.org ts.org c2.org
q.org wz.org e3.org
s.org xq.org h9.org
t.org zg.org i6.org
v.org zi.org k4.org
w.org zq.org
z.org
Enom
1-letter 1-number 2-letters 2-numbers 2-characters
B.ORG 0.ORG PJ.ORG 31.ORG 0D.ORG
F.ORG 1.ORG UR.ORG 75.ORG 0N.ORG
G.ORG 2.ORG YK.ORG 0P.ORG
J.ORG 3.ORG YO.ORG 0T.ORG
L.ORG 4.ORG ZL.ORG 1W.ORG
M.ORG 5.ORG ZP.ORG 3G.ORG
P.ORG 6.ORG 57.ORG
R.ORG 7.ORG 5C.ORG
U.ORG 8.ORG 6G.ORG
Y.ORG 9.ORG 9Q.ORG
D3.ORG
O7.ORG
R4.ORG
Z8.ORG
Z9.ORG

Namejet – Enom whois privacy glitch

I have won several domain names at Namejet auctions. One problem I always have is this. A lot of the domain names I won are behind privacy before I win them and continue to be behind privacy after these are in my account at Enom. (I am only talking about Enom auctioned domains) That is probably because the owner that is selling the domain name at Namejet has the domains behind privacy. Or it is because the previous owners, that let the domain names expire, also had the domain names behind privacy.

The problem is that privacy is not removed after I won the domain names and these are pushed into my account. This only happens with domains that are registered with Enom.

Most of the time the domains that are behind privacy appear in my Enom account with privacy disabled even thought whois shows them behind privacy. So I have to ask support to remove privacy from my domains. I do this because I rarely use privacy for my domains and also because I can’t receive emails to these domains. It is most probable that privacy is attached to the previous account, the one that bought the privacy. So if an interested party emails the privacy email address, I don’t receive the email. I discovered that while transferring the domain names out of Enom. I requested the authorization codes for my domains but never got them. Enom support is very responsive but you have to go through the whole process in order to remove privacy that you never requested.

Also, be careful for privacy (that is enabled in your account) not to be on auto renew if you don’t need it. You will actually pay for privacy you didn’t order if you don’t remove the auto renew.