DomainNameSales.com: Integration With Uniregistry And New Documents.link

dns_brokersDomainNameSales.com issued an announcement to inform users of upcoming changes between now and Q1 2015.

Frank Schilling has had more than 12 million in sales up to now in 2014.

With the completion of Uniregistry the development team has turned to the integration of the sales platform. In a few short months DNS will debut inside Uniregistry. Regardless of where your names live, you’ll soon be able to load names into the Uniregistry manager to better manage and sell your domain names.

Uniregistry’s Documents.link feature (debuting this week), will let you store documents, legal notices and sales inquiries relating to domain-names — all inside the Uniregistry Manager. This useful system lets you email, store and maintain notifications received from outside parties using Uniregistry and the Amazon cloud. Continue reading

DomainNameSales.com Domain Parking Problems

I tried visiting today one of my domains that is parked at DomainNameSales.com and found that it is not displaying any ads or links of categories in my case. I got a message saying: “Failed to load page content”. This is what I got:
dns-problem-1

I then tried to reload the page and got this: Continue reading

My 1st Uniregistry Domain Name Offer And Maybe Frank Send It My Way!

While I have received more than 15 offers for my New gTLD domain names (but haven’t sold any) today I got my first offer through Uniregistry, the registrar owned by Frank Schilling.

I am getting offers either directly by email or by prospective buyers visiting the lander of my New gTLD domains that are parked at the DomainNameSales.com (DNS) platform but today I got an offer at DNS that seemed a bit strange at first. Instead of the usual DNS symbol next to my offer that looks like an RSS feed I saw the Uniregistry logo:

DNS-NewgTLD-offer

The buyer from Amsterdam made 7 offers until he made it over my minimum offer price that is set at $1,500 for all my domains at DNS. His last offer for my xxxxxx.photos domains was for
Continue reading

Some DomainNameSales.com Emails Are Caught By Spam Filters (And What To Do)

I can confirm that some DomainNameSales.com emails are caught by spam filters. Sure it depends on individual settings and the the service that each buyer is using but it is happening. I don’t know how widespread this is but I do know that Gmail is putting some emails coming from @DomainNameSales.com in the spam folder.

I have been using the DomainNameSales.com platform since November 2012 but transferred the bulk of my domains to the platform in June 2013.

All this time I have made some very good sales through the platform and a couple using the DomainNameSales.com brokers but I always had this notion that a few of my quotes went unanswered because the potential buyers never got my email reply. That is especially true for buyers that Continue reading

How To Use: Uniregistry Affiliate Plus Program and DomainNameSales.com Integration

The Uniregistry Affiliate Plus (UAP) Program that allows DomainNameSales.com parking customers another avenue by which they can monetize their names has published a “how to” guide.

Last week Uniregistry announced the new domain name affiliate program, called Affiliate Plus, and a few days later they announced the first integration between DomainNameSales.com and Uniregistry.

Traditionally, PPC parking revenue places a set of advertisements or search links on parked pages. When visitors to the pages click on the ads, money is earned by the owner of the domain name. Participation in the UAP program places other ads or links on parked pages when clicked on and visitors continue on to register, renew or transfer domain names at Uniregistry, a healthy commission (currently up to 35%) is paid to owner of the parked domain. These earnings are in perpetuity for as long as the name is registered by the original registrant. Read more about the program here http://uniregistry.com/affiliates/about.

Participation in this program is easy. It can be done in 2 steps.
Continue reading

Affiliate Intergration Between DomainNameSales.com and Uniregistry Announced

Last week Uniregistry announced the new domain name affiliate program, called Affiliate Plus, and not more than a few days later they have already announced the first of many future integrations between DomainNameSales.com and Uniregistry.

Now you can use the Portfolios/Affiliates tab in the Settings menu of DomainNameSales to select different Uniregistry affiliate offerings and display them on your parked pages. DNS offers the same pay-rates as a direct signup via Uniregistry.

You can read more about the genesis of the Uniregistry Affiliate Plus program in Frank Schilling’s Continue reading

DomainNameSales.com Adds “Firm” Price Option in Inquiries

DomainNameSales.com, the popular parking and sales platform, just added a “Firm” price option when a seller sends a quote of a counter-offer to a buyer.

I was replying to some inquiries today when I noticed the extra option on the left of the selling price when I tried to check the “Record Price” option:

DNS-firm-optionActually I would prefer if it was put on the right side and “Record Price” option returns to it’s previous position. I am sure that a lot of users, including me, will be confused at first. And a few may check it thinking it is the “Record Price” option.

Anyway, the “Firm” option means that the price you are quoting to the buyer is firm and that you will not entertain lower offers. Buyers are then sent directly to the checkout page where they have to decide to buy or not. I hope then can still send a message.

This is a useful option but I wouldn’t use it on the first quote but rather later in the negotiations.

It’s also good to know that DNS keeps improving day by day. Good job.

DomainNameSales: brokers average $15,000 per sale, new minimum commission at $175

Effective February 15th DomainNameSales.com will charge a minimum commission of $175 per sale. This means that any domain under the $1400 threshold will be charged at $175 instead of the 12.5% commission.

Also on February 28th will be the launch date of the new registrar at Uniregistry.com that will offer com, net, org, all material CCTlds and all relevant new GTLDs under one roof.

Finally, DomainNameSales has a team of 19 brokers in Grand Cayman. On average, the 19 brokers spend 4 hours on each closed deal and the average sale price is in the vicinity of $15,000 per sale.

Here is the complete DomainNameSales announcement:

Happy New Year! This is going to be a year of monumental change for us all. Firstly, in regard to DNS, The DNS platform is unique because it lets you self-broker your sales, and negotiate via the DNS iPhone app. You can set buy-it-now prices on all of your low value (under $1500) domain names and directly field inquiries with preset email templates via your iPhone while you’re on the mountain, at the beach or in your car (hopefully in the passenger seat). : ) You can also insert any broker you choose (on leads generated from your own domains), and we sincerely thank all our customers who have chosen DNS to act as their broker.

We have a team of 19 brokers here in Grand Cayman and we realize what our strengths are. Selling names is hard work. On average, our brokers spend 4 hours on each closed deal. Our average sale price is in the vicinity of $15,000 per sale. Effective February 15th we will need to charge minimum commissions of $175 per sale. If you have domain names that are very low priced (under $1500), you can continue to sell them yourself without charge, but if you require DNS to take phone calls, do manual work and hand-hold your low price deals to completion we will need to apply this minimum charge.

On February 28th we will be launching our new registrar at Uniregistry.com. The birth of our registrar will usher in a fleet of positive changes for you. In the near future, Uniregistry customers will be able to sell their names (of all prices) at lower cost. As a Uniregistry preferred customer you will be able to create payment plan sales on your premium names at DNS, just as I do.. You will be able to use our credit card merchant services to sell (or finance) your domain names with instant completion (no escrow required). Uniregistry intends to offer com, net, org, all material CCTlds and all relevant new GTLDs under one roof. You will be able to safe-keep all your names in one easy to use management interface. This is not a light registrar. We have been working on Uniregistry for a long time and hope it will be the best funded, most registrant centric new registrar offering, ever.

We have additional changes in the works to allow you to profit from your relationship with us and intend to roll those out in the coming months.

I?m looking forward to serving you beginning Feb 28th.

Thanks sincerely, Frank.

Go Daddy and Afternic Offer/Auction Confusion

I was trying to figure out if Go Daddy has changed anything in how it treats domain names listed for sale in Afternic and Sedo (partnership soon to end) in Go Daddy auctions. Still the domain names are treated like being in auction and an end user is sent to Go Daddy Auctions when searching for a domain name at Go Daddy AND the domain name is listed in one or both Afternic/Sedo marketplaces. This perpetual 80 day auction has always been a problem to me.

Go Daddy treats domains from the Domain Name Sales/GoDaddy syndication differently. It redirects an interested party to a form where he/she enters contact details and these details are then sent to a Domain Name Sales broker. Actually I had a few problems with that as well.

uniinstaller.com0I chose my domain name uninstaller.com to test this integration and that was clearly a poor choice as it turned out later…

To make things clear from the start. I don’t have the domain listed at Go Daddy. I don’t have the domain name listed at the DomainNameSales and I have stopped the GoDaddy syndication. I don’t have the domain listed at Afternic. I only have the domain listed at Sedo with no Buy It Now price and with a minimum bid of 10,000 Euro. (about $13,600)

I enter uninstaller.com in the Go Daddy search and this is what I get:

uniinstaller.com1Good news, this domain is available
uninstaller
.com
Auction
Current bid $30,000.00
Get It

I click “Get It” and I get:uniinstaller.com2
uninstaller.com
Price: $30,000
Offer $19,500 or more
or Buy Now for $30000
Time Left: 56D 3H

Auction Ends: 2014/03/27 09:16 AM (PST)
Price: $30,000
Sale Type: Offer/Counter-Offer with Buy Now
Bids/Offers: 0
Views: 11

At this point I thought that the domain could still be listed at Afternic by the previous owner so I visit Afternic.com. So I found it on Afternic listed with a $30000 Buy Now price and a minimum offer of $10,000. Probably from the previous owner.

Although this explains the Buy Now price it doesn’t explain the $19,500 minimum offer at Go Daddy. It seems that this minimum offer price doesn’t come from anywhere.

I then tried to add uninstaller.com in my Afternic.com account but I got a message that the domain is already listed on Afternic but not an option of what to do next. I sent an message to support and wait for their reply. 2 days later and no reply.

uniinstaller.com3So if this isn’t confusing then I don’t know what is. And maybe I can figure this whole mess out but what about regular end users searching for domains at Go Daddy?

A potential buyer will see that my domain name is at an Offer/Counter-Offer with Buy Now Auction that ends in 56D 3H and the auction price is $30,000 although there are no bids.

It is an auction but not an auction. It has a price but no bids. It’s an Offer/Counter-Offer with Buy Now that ends in 56D 3H.

Go figure.

DomainNameSales.com: clean your account from domains you don’t own

DomainNameSales and Frank Schilling just sent an email with the subject “January Housekeeping – DomainNameSales.com”. They are asking all the DNS partners to remove all domains from their accounts that they no longer own. These domains could be sold in other platforms/venues or simply expired. They said that they had several occurrences this year of sales-platform clients, agreeing to sell domain names that they have previously sold, or no longer own.

Personally I have never agreed to sell a domain that I don’t own. None of my domains are set at BIN on any of the venues I use including DNS. Also I have stopped using the DNS/Go Daddy syndication because of a lot of problems I had with it. I got a reply from DNS about this.

For the domains I broker myself I don’t think there is anywhere that DNS is involved. That only leaves my domains that are sold at the DNS platform and a buyer calls or emails a broker at DNS. In both cases I always check if I own a domain name before providing a price let alone before agreeing to a sale.

I have never sold a domain I don’t own if my 14 years in domaining.

Now sure what this means exactly:

If you have domain names for sale through our syndication channel or on our platform and you represent that you own them, and that subsequently turns out to be untrue, we will have to immediately suspend your DNS parking and sales account.

Is this suspension only happening in case of a false sale or not? Now if DNS wants to suspend my account if I have an expired domain in my account of thousands of domains then there is not much I can do.

A few days back GoDaddy.com was listed for sale at Domain Name Sales!. Everybody makes mistakes and most of the time it has nothing to do with “truth, honestly and trust”.

Here is the email from Frank:

Dear Partners. We have had several occurrences this year of sales-platform clients, agreeing to sell domain names that they have previously sold, or no longer own.

If you have domain names for sale through our syndication channel or on our platform and you represent that you own them, and that subsequently turns out to be untrue, we will have to immediately suspend your DNS parking and sales account.

Good stewardship of your portfolio, truth, honestly and trust are the basis of our relationship. We value the partners who live up to those ideals but can not support those who unduly create administrative burdens for us through poor stewardship of their domain name portfolios or who are too preoccupied to check whether they still own the names which they agree to sell.

Please take this opportunity to clean your account and only identify names which you own as for sale.

Sincerely,

Frank Schilling